Ron Savelo

Author Archives: Ron Savelo

March 23, 2010

The Story of Bottled Water

The Story of Stuff Project Presents

“The Story of Bottled Water”

Today is World Water Day, and to mark the occasion I’m joining with some of North America’s leading environmental groups to release the latest Story of Stuff Project short film:  The Story of Bottled Water.

Like The Story of Stuff, this new film uses simple words and images to explain a complex problem, in this case manufactured demand:  how you get people to think they need to spend money on something they don’t actually need or already have.

Over the last two decades, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Nestle and other big beverage companies have spent untold millions of dollars making us afraid of tap water. They’ve told us that if we want to be sure what we drink is pure and clean-not to mention hip and fashionable-we should buy bottled water.

Unfortunately, it worked.

In the United States alone, we consume approximately 500,000,000 bottles of water each week. Imagine that: while 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water worldwide, other people spend billions of dollars on a bottled product that’s no cleaner, harms people and the environment and costs up to 2,000 times the price of tap water.

But there’s good news: Last year, for the first time in a long time, bottled water sales fell-not that much, but they went down. Consumers who want economy, portability and convenience are switching to refillable metal bottles. Restaurants are proudly serving tap water. And cities, states, companies and schools around the world are ditching the bottle to save money and do their part for the environment.

Still, we’ve got a ways to go.

So please, take a minute today to watch The Story of Bottled Water. Then pass it along to your friends, family, neighbors and co-workers-anyone you think might be interested.

You are The Story of Stuff Project’s strongest allies:  You made the original Story of Stuff an Internet phenomenon, with nearly 9 million views total. Last December, you pushed The Story of Cap & Trade past half a million views in just under six weeks. And in the last ten days, you’ve helped our new book, The Story of Stuff, enter the New York Times extended bestseller list at #35. Thank you a million times over.

After you’ve forwarded The Story of Bottled Water to your networks, I encourage you to join a campaign for investment in clean tap water for everyone, like those sponsored by our partners at Corporate Accountability International, Food & Water Watch, Polaris Institute, Environmental Working Group, and Pacific Institute. Visit these fantastic groups’ websites to learn more, sign-up and get involved.

Together, we can send Coke, Pepsi, Nestle and the rest of the industry a message as clear as a glass of tap water: We’re not buying into your manufactured demand anymore. We’ll choose our own demands, thank you very much, and we’re demanding clean safe water for all!

Sincerely,

Annie Leonard

March 8, 2010

The Census Is Getting Way Too Personal

QUESTIONS THAT THE CENSUS BUREAU REFUSED OR FAILED TO ANSWER (from Jerry Day’s Matrix News Network segment: “The Census Is Getting Personal”):

1) The Constitution authorizes government to count people but it does not authorize the taking of private information or even the names of individuals. From where does the Census Bureau derive authority to demand our private information?

2) Is there any limit to the amount and type of private information that the Census bureau may demand and collect?

3) Under what Constitutional authority does the Census Bureau collect information now from 250,000 people per month of every year?

4) The 4th Amendment to the Constitution prohibits government search and seizure of private information without a court warrant based on probable cause, Current Census policies violate that Amendment do they not?

5) By what Constitutional authority does the Census Bureau threaten penalties for failure to provide personal information?

6) The Census Bureau claims it maintains privacy of personal information, Are there any circumstances under which law enforcement or spy agencies can access Census information?

7) Since presumably Census data may be subpoenaed by law enforcement, may individuals refuse to answer questions according to the fifth Amendment?

8) Why has the Census Bureau decided to collect GPS coordinates for every home?

9) Virtually every government database has been either lost, hacked or compromised, would the Census Bureau’s claim of data security not be an outright lie or at best highly improbable?

10) How would the Census Bureau locate, protect and compensate those individuals whose data becomes compromised?

There is a great deal of confusion about the Census “short form” and “Long Form” because the Census Bureau has failed to equally publicize the two current approaches. Part of the video refers to the long form called the “American Community Survey” which has 12 pages of questions, many of which are much more probing than the short form. A PDF file of the the long form can be viewed at this link: http://www.jerryday.com/images/ACS-1-…

January 30, 2010

Green Mental Health: An Alternative to Toxic Psychiatric Drugs

This informative video features Genita Petralli, a Nutritional Biochemist and author of the book
Green Mental Health Care – How to Get Off & Stay Off Psychiatric Drugs

“My life is dedicated to reclaiming lives from psychiatric drugs and exposing psychiatry for what it is; a gang of white collar drug pushers robbing our society of every resource that supports it right down to our future; the children. To sit on the sidelines and do nothing while I watch people suffer from the effects of psychiatric drugs is not an option.”    Genita Petralli

Psychiatry’s solution to life’s problems is the administration of toxic drugs which according to the FDA can cause mania, worsening depression, anxiety, delusions, seizures, liver failure, suicide, mania, heart attack, stroke, fatal blood clots, sudden death, diabetes and much more. Green Mental Health Care is a non-toxic, non-addictive and non-invasive approach to mental health which focuses on workable medical, not psychiatric, solutions that have better patient outcomes and are not harmful or toxic to those seeking help.